Health Updates

shs student health services students walking along palm walk on sunny day

Flu Season is Here!

As flu season approaches, it is important that you be prepared. In addition to getting a flu shot, which is highly recommended, here are some other easy precautions to prevent infection:

  1. Get a flu shot
  2. Washing hands often and well
  3. Using alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  4. Covering coughs and sneezes
  5. Keeping one's distance from sick people

More reasons why getting the flu vaccine is highly recommended:

  • Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.
  • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
  • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations

Find more information from the CDC (Center for Disease Control).

To schedule your flu shot, call SHS at 310-338-2881 or book an appointment online through the MyHealth Portal through MyLMU by clicking the button below.

Health and Safety Tips for Spring Break

Make this year’s spring break memorable by having fun and helping yourself, your friends, and others stay safe and healthy.

LIMIT ALCOHOL

If drinking alcohol is part of your break, remember that it can impair your judgment and actions. Alcohol-related motor vehicle crashes kill someone every 31 minutes and non fatally injure someone every two minutes. Don’t drink and drive. There are plenty of non-alcoholic alternatives. Find more information at the following resources:

Alcohol: Frequently Asked Questions

Impaired Driving: The Facts

Quick Stats: Binge Drinking

College Drinking: Changing the Culture

Alcohol: A Women's Health Issue

BE ACTIVE

You’ve probably been sitting most of the year working at the computer, studying, or in class. During the break, take the opportunity to start a fitness program. Do a variety of fun activities like walking, dancing, playing volleyball, swimming, and more. It doesn’t need to be hard to be beneficial. Avoid injury by starting any new activity slowly. Be active for at least 2.5 hours a week. Include activities that raise your breathing and heart rates and that strengthen your muscles.

Adding Physical Activity to Your Life

PLAN AHEAD

If you are going on a trip, be prepared. Are vaccinations required? Are there special food, destination, or other things you need to consider ahead of time? If you are taking medications, do you have enough for the trip? Know what’s happening en route or at your travel destination. Find more tips at the following resources:

Travelers' Health

What Vaccinations Do You Need?

Spring Break Travel Safety

WATCH YOUR STEP

There may be temptations on your break that involve different or high-risk activity. Think twice before putting yourself at risk for injury. Be sure to use appropriate safety gear before venturing out, such as seat belts, life vests, or knee pads. Remember that unintentional injuries kill more Americans in their first three decades of life than any other cause of death. In fact, injuries (both unintentional and those caused by acts of violence) are among the top ten killers for Americans of all ages.

Water-Related Injuries

PROTECT YOUR EYES

If you wear contact lenses, practice healthy wear and care tips, even when you're on vacation. Carry a spare pair of glasses and contact lens supplies with you so you can take out your contacts safely when you need to. Remove contacts before swimming, as exposing contact lenses to water can lead to painful, sometimes blinding eye infections. Always take your contacts out before bed, even if you’re up late or traveling. Sleeping in contact lenses has been linked to serious eye infections.

Water and Contact Lenses

Protect Your Eyes

PROTECT YOURSELF FROM THE SUN

After a cold winter, it’s tempting to stay in the hot sun all day. Although getting a little sun can have some benefits, excessive and unprotected sun exposure can result in premature aging, changes in skin texture, and skin cancer. Always wear sunscreen with at least SPF 15. For eye protection, wear wraparound sunglasses that provide 100 percent UV ray protection

Sun Safety

Indoor Tanning Is Not Safe

For more information on health & safety, see the Center for Disease Control's (CDC) official website

  • Summer 2018: Health Tips

    10 Tips for a Healthy Summer

    1. Keep Hydrated: Drink 8-10 glasses of water daily to help prevent illness and maintain healthy bones and muscles
    2. Eat Fresh Foods: Eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables
    3. Get Regular Exercise: A regiment of regular exercise enhances one's cardiovascular system, reduce pain, and levels of stress.
    4. Improve Your Lifestyle: Improve one's lifestyle by getting outside and participating in new sports, clubs, or activities.
    5. Visit Your Doctor: Take care of past health issues. Pain and injury from the winter or spring season can inhibit one's ability to enjoy summer fun. See your doctor so you can maximize your summer.
    6. Stay in the Shade: Stay in the shade as much as possible to limit exposure to direct sunshine during peak hours, 10 am to 4 pm, when the sun is strongest and UV levels are at their highest.
    7. Take a Personal Vacation: Get away from home and work for a change of pace and surroundings to relax as it is necessary to re-energize and improve one's quality of life.
    8. Disconnect from Electronic Devices: Disconnect from electronic devices such as internet and cell phones and participate in activities that encourage socialization with other people.
    9. Get Plenty of Sleep: Get to bed at a reasonable time and get good quality sleep is necessary for one's mental and physical health, safety, and quality of life.
    10. Avoid Getting Overheated: Stay in cool places such as neighborhood swimming pools, or frequent places that are air conditioned

    Source: Advanced Pain Management

     

  • April 2018: Measles

    The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health notified LMU that a student has been diagnosed with measles. The student, who lives off campus, is no longer considered contagious and has been cleared to return to class. Measles is contagious and can spread through coughing or sneezing and is treated through supportive care such as rest, fluids and acetaminophen. Those whose immune systems are compromised, including those who are pregnant or vaccine objectors, are especially vulnerable to the measles virus.

    Student Health Services (SHS) reminds community members of the importance of being vaccinated against communicable diseases such as measles and encourages all to check their measles vaccine status to ensure it is up to date. The measles vaccine is known as MMR and two doses are required. Please check your immunization records to ensure you have had this vaccine and if not, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or if a student, contact SHS. All are encouraged to practice good cough hygiene by covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, frequent handwashing, adequate sleep and hydration.

  • December 2017: Tuberculosis

    The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health notified LMU that a student had been diagnosed with active tuberculosis (TB). Active tuberculosis is a contagious infection, curable if treated properly. The student has begun treatment and the Department of Public Health has determined that the student is no longer contagious and has been cleared to return to campus. The university is working closely with the Department of Public Health and is contacting those who may have been exposed.

    LMU and the L.A. Department of Public Health will continue to ensure the health and safety of our community. Please practice good hygiene by covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, frequent handwashing, adequate sleep, and hydration. For further information and resources about tuberculosis, please visit: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    If you have further questions or concerns, please contact us at (310) 338-2881.

  • November 2017: Flu Shots

    As flu season approaches, it is important that you be prepared. In addition to getting a flu shot, which is highly recommended, here are some other easy precautions to prevent infection:

    1. Get a flu shot

    2. Washing hands often and well

    3. Using alcohol-based hand sanitizer

    4. Covering coughs and sneezes

    5. Keeping one's distance from sick people

     

    Here are some reasons why getting the flu vaccine is highly recommended by the CDC

    • Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.
    • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
    • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations

    For more information from the CDC, click: https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/preventing.htm 

     

    To book your flu shot, call SHS at 310-338-2881 or book an appointment online through the MyHealth Portal through MyLMU.