Health Updates

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Community Health Advisory

Student Health Services (SHS) shares this community advisory for informational and awareness purposes only.

Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVISORY - October 24, 2019

Student Health Services (SHS) shares this community advisory for informational and awareness purposes only.

SHS has seen several students with confirmed cases of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). SHS has notified the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. HFMD is a viral infection that usually causes mild illness, and most people completely recover in seven to 10 days. Treatment is supportive care. Get plenty of fluids and rest. Take over-the-counter ibuprofen or acetaminophen for fever and pain. 

Symptoms of HFMD include: 

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Sore throat including painful sores in the mouth 
  • A painful,red rash which may blister on the hands and feet  
  • A rash may also occur on the arms, legs, face and scalp.

Infected individuals should not go to class and avoid close contact with others until 24 hours after their fever subsides and blisters in their mouth, hands or feet have healed. Quarantine is not necessary.

Ways to prevent getting HFMD:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water after using the bathroom 
  • Use paper towels when touching restroom handles (toilet, faucets, door knobs) 
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands 
  • Avoid close contact with an infected person, including kissing, hugging, shaking hands and sharing cups and eating utensils 

Should you experience any symptoms of HFMD, please contact your health care provider or call SHS at 310.338.2881. For more information on hand, foot and mouth disease, visit the  CDC website.

 

  • Flu Shots

    As flu season approaches, it is important that you be prepared. In addition to getting a flu shot, which is highly recommended, here are some other easy precautions to prevent infection:

    1. Get a flu shot

    2. Washing hands often and well

    3. Using alcohol-based hand sanitizer

    4. Covering coughs and sneezes

    5. Keeping one's distance from sick people

     

    Here are some reasons why getting the flu vaccine is highly recommended by the CDC

    • Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine.
    • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common. (See Vaccine Virus Selection for this season’s vaccine composition.)
    • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations

    For more information from the CDC, click: CDC Flu Prevention

     

    To book your flu shot, call SHS at 310-338-2881 or book an appointment online through the MyHealth Portal through MyLMU.

  • Severe Pulmonary Disease Associated with Using E-Cigarette Products

    Severe Pulmonary Disease Associated with Using E-Cigarette Products

    COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVISORY - September 2019

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is providing: 1) background information on the forms of e-cigarette products, 2) information on the multi-state outbreak of severe pulmonary disease associated with using e-cigarette products (devices, liquids, refill pods, and cartridges), and 3) clinical features of patients with severe pulmonary disease. This health advisory also provides recommendations for clinicians, public health officials, and the public based on currently available information.

    The etiology of e-cigarette-associated pulmonary disease is undetermined, epidemiologic investigations in affected states are ongoing to better characterize the exposures, demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and behaviors of patients. All patients have reported using e-cigarette products. The exact number is currently unknown, but many patients have reported using e-cigarettes containing cannabinoid products such as THC or CBD. 

    For the full CDC advisory, click here.

  • Measles - April 2019

    Measles Reported Near LMU

    COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVISORY - April 24, 2019

    Measles Incidents Reported Near LMU The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced that several locations near LMU, including LAX, UCLA and California State University, Los Angeles, have possibly been exposed to measles. There have been no known cases identified at LMU. Measles is contagious and can spread through coughing or sneezing and is treated through supportive care such as rest, fluids and acetaminophen. Those whose immune systems are compromised, including those who are pregnant or vaccine objectors, are especially vulnerable to the measles virus. SHS reminds community members of the importance of being vaccinated against communicable diseases such as measles and encourages all to check their vaccine status to ensure it is up to date. The measles vaccine is known as MMR and two doses are required. Please check your immunization records to ensure you have had this vaccine and if not, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or if a student, contact SHS. All are encouraged to practice good cough hygiene by covering a cough or sneeze with a tissue, washing hands frequently, getting adequate sleep and staying hydrated. 

    More information from the CDC.

    Student Health Services (SHS) reminds community members of the importance of being vaccinated against communicable diseases such as measles and encourages all to check their measles vaccine status to ensure it is up to date. The measles vaccine is known as MMR and two doses are required. Please check your immunization records to ensure you have had this vaccine and if not, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or if a student, contact SHS. All are encouraged to practice good cough hygiene by covering your cough or sneeze with a tissue, frequent handwashing, adequate sleep and hydration. 

    The Los Angeles County Department of Public Health announced that several locations near LMU, including LAX, UCLA and California State University, Los Angeles, have possibly been exposed to measles. There have been no known cases identified at LMU. Measles is contagious and can spread through coughing or sneezing and is treated through supportive care such as rest, fluids and acetaminophen. Those whose immune systems are compromised, including those who are pregnant or vaccine objectors, are especially vulnerable to the measles virus. SHS reminds community members of the importance of being vaccinated against communicable diseases such as measles and encourages all to check their vaccine status to ensure it is up to date. The measles vaccine is known as MMR and two doses are required. Please check your immunization records to ensure you have had this vaccine and if not, schedule an appointment with your healthcare provider or if a student, contact SHS. All are encouraged to practice good cough hygiene by covering a cough or sneeze with a tissue, washing hands frequently, getting adequate sleep and staying hydrated. 

  • Summer: Health Tips

    10 Tips for a Healthy Summer

    1. Keep Hydrated: Drink 8-10 glasses of water daily to help prevent illness and maintain healthy bones and muscles
    2. Eat Fresh Foods: Eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables
    3. Get Regular Exercise: A regiment of regular exercise enhances one's cardiovascular system, reduce pain, and levels of stress.
    4. Improve Your Lifestyle: Improve one's lifestyle by getting outside and participating in new sports, clubs, or activities.
    5. Visit Your Doctor: Take care of past health issues. Pain and injury from the winter or spring season can inhibit one's ability to enjoy summer fun. See your doctor so you can maximize your summer.
    6. Stay in the Shade: Stay in the shade as much as possible to limit exposure to direct sunshine during peak hours, 10 am to 4 pm, when the sun is strongest and UV levels are at their highest.
    7. Take a Personal Vacation: Get away from home and work for a change of pace and surroundings to relax as it is necessary to re-energize and improve one's quality of life.
    8. Disconnect from Electronic Devices: Disconnect from electronic devices such as internet and cell phones and participate in activities that encourage socialization with other people.
    9. Get Plenty of Sleep: Get to bed at a reasonable time and get good quality sleep is necessary for one's mental and physical health, safety, and quality of life.
    10. Avoid Getting Overheated: Stay in cool places such as neighborhood swimming pools, or frequent places that are air conditioned

    Source: Advanced Pain Management